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DevMynd
Welcome to Tandem. We were formerly known as DevMynd. Read more about our new identity.

Our Guidebooks
Our Guidebooks
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Agile Product Design

Agile product design is all about getting from product ideas to product choices. It’s a process we’ve used many times at DevMynd to help get the product out of a customer’s head and into an executable plan. This guidebook serves as an overview of that process, and in true agile fashion is a living document that we regularly review and update based on our learning.

The following steps comprise what we call “Agile Product Design”. It’s “Agile” because this process is not meant to be rigid. The structure here is more akin to a bouncy castle than a concrete bunker, it’s intended to flex. For some teams and individuals various parts of the process will be difficult, others will just click. For this reason we facilitate the process and curate the conversation so it stays productive and on target.

Stage 1: Chartering

The first milestone is to create a charter which will serve as a set of anchor tenants for an initiative. We often talk about how the word “Charter” seems so imperious and heavy, but it’s sort of the right word. It’s the “We the people…” for the project, it doesn’t say what we’re going to build, or how, it says why.

It’s helpful to think about chartering as an activity that can happen several times over the course of an effort. It’s conceivable that an overall initiative would be broken down into multiple projects each with their own version of the charter.

the statement

The charter statement is a short paragraph (1-3 sentences at most), maybe bullet points, that explain the reason we’re building something. These reasons could be business related, but are more effective if they’re focused around the end-user or consumer, even if that’s an internal entity. Some examples:

the statement

Musician’s Marketplace will provide a marketplace for musician’s to buy and sell used instruments and equipment.

An online e-commerce platform where musician’s can post advertisements for things they’d like to sell and others can purchase the items.

the statement

The Global Reporting project provides insight to customers into the condition and maintenance investment of their global vehicle fleet. These insights will help customers make better decisions about maintenance providers and vehicle turnover.

Stage 2: Goals & Success Criteria

The first milestone is to create a charter which will serve as a set of anchor tenants for an initiative. We often talk about how the word “Charter” seems so imperious and heavy, but it’s sort of the right word. It’s the “We the people…” for the project, it doesn’t say what we’re going to build, or how, it says why.

It’s helpful to think about chartering as an activity that can happen several times over the course of an effort. It’s conceivable that an overall initiative would be broken down into multiple projects each with their own version of the charter.

the statement

The charter statement is a short paragraph (1-3 sentences at most), maybe bullet points, that explain the reason we’re building something. These reasons could be business related, but are more effective if they’re focused around the end-user or consumer, even if that’s an internal entity. Some examples:

the statement

Musician’s Marketplace will provide a marketplace for musician’s to buy and sell used instruments and equipment.

An online e-commerce platform where musician’s can post advertisements for things they’d like to sell and others can purchase the items.

the statement

The Global Reporting project provides insight to customers into the condition and maintenance investment of their global vehicle fleet. These insights will help customers make better decisions about maintenance providers and vehicle turnover.

Stage 3: Personas

The first milestone is to create a charter which will serve as a set of anchor tenants for an initiative. We often talk about how the word “Charter” seems so imperious and heavy, but it’s sort of the right word. It’s the “We the people…” for the project, it doesn’t say what we’re going to build, or how, it says why.

It’s helpful to think about chartering as an activity that can happen several times over the course of an effort. It’s conceivable that an overall initiative would be broken down into multiple projects each with their own version of the charter.

the statement

The charter statement is a short paragraph (1-3 sentences at most), maybe bullet points, that explain the reason we’re building something. These reasons could be business related, but are more effective if they’re focused around the end-user or consumer, even if that’s an internal entity. Some examples:

the statement

Musician’s Marketplace will provide a marketplace for musician’s to buy and sell used instruments and equipment.

An online e-commerce platform where musician’s can post advertisements for things they’d like to sell and others can purchase the items.

the statement

The Global Reporting project provides insight to customers into the condition and maintenance investment of their global vehicle fleet. These insights will help customers make better decisions about maintenance providers and vehicle turnover.

Stage 4: Storymapping

The first milestone is to create a charter which will serve as a set of anchor tenants for an initiative. We often talk about how the word “Charter” seems so imperious and heavy, but it’s sort of the right word. It’s the “We the people…” for the project, it doesn’t say what we’re going to build, or how, it says why.

It’s helpful to think about chartering as an activity that can happen several times over the course of an effort. It’s conceivable that an overall initiative would be broken down into multiple projects each with their own version of the charter.

the statement

The charter statement is a short paragraph (1-3 sentences at most), maybe bullet points, that explain the reason we’re building something. These reasons could be business related, but are more effective if they’re focused around the end-user or consumer, even if that’s an internal entity. Some examples:

the statement

Musician’s Marketplace will provide a marketplace for musician’s to buy and sell used instruments and equipment.

An online e-commerce platform where musician’s can post advertisements for things they’d like to sell and others can purchase the items.

the statement

The Global Reporting project provides insight to customers into the condition and maintenance investment of their global vehicle fleet. These insights will help customers make better decisions about maintenance providers and vehicle turnover.

Stage 5: Slicing

The first milestone is to create a charter which will serve as a set of anchor tenants for an initiative. We often talk about how the word “Charter” seems so imperious and heavy, but it’s sort of the right word. It’s the “We the people…” for the project, it doesn’t say what we’re going to build, or how, it says why.

It’s helpful to think about chartering as an activity that can happen several times over the course of an effort. It’s conceivable that an overall initiative would be broken down into multiple projects each with their own version of the charter.

the statement

The charter statement is a short paragraph (1-3 sentences at most), maybe bullet points, that explain the reason we’re building something. These reasons could be business related, but are more effective if they’re focused around the end-user or consumer, even if that’s an internal entity. Some examples:

the statement

Musician’s Marketplace will provide a marketplace for musician’s to buy and sell used instruments and equipment.

An online e-commerce platform where musician’s can post advertisements for things they’d like to sell and others can purchase the items.

the statement

The Global Reporting project provides insight to customers into the condition and maintenance investment of their global vehicle fleet. These insights will help customers make better decisions about maintenance providers and vehicle turnover.

Stage 6: Testing

The first milestone is to create a charter which will serve as a set of anchor tenants for an initiative. We often talk about how the word “Charter” seems so imperious and heavy, but it’s sort of the right word. It’s the “We the people…” for the project, it doesn’t say what we’re going to build, or how, it says why.

It’s helpful to think about chartering as an activity that can happen several times over the course of an effort. It’s conceivable that an overall initiative would be broken down into multiple projects each with their own version of the charter.

the statement

The charter statement is a short paragraph (1-3 sentences at most), maybe bullet points, that explain the reason we’re building something. These reasons could be business related, but are more effective if they’re focused around the end-user or consumer, even if that’s an internal entity. Some examples:

the statement

Musician’s Marketplace will provide a marketplace for musician’s to buy and sell used instruments and equipment.

An online e-commerce platform where musician’s can post advertisements for things they’d like to sell and others can purchase the items.

the statement

The Global Reporting project provides insight to customers into the condition and maintenance investment of their global vehicle fleet. These insights will help customers make better decisions about maintenance providers and vehicle turnover.

Stage 7: Release Mapping

The first milestone is to create a charter which will serve as a set of anchor tenants for an initiative. We often talk about how the word “Charter” seems so imperious and heavy, but it’s sort of the right word. It’s the “We the people…” for the project, it doesn’t say what we’re going to build, or how, it says why.

It’s helpful to think about chartering as an activity that can happen several times over the course of an effort. It’s conceivable that an overall initiative would be broken down into multiple projects each with their own version of the charter.

the statement

The charter statement is a short paragraph (1-3 sentences at most), maybe bullet points, that explain the reason we’re building something. These reasons could be business related, but are more effective if they’re focused around the end-user or consumer, even if that’s an internal entity. Some examples:

the statement

Musician’s Marketplace will provide a marketplace for musician’s to buy and sell used instruments and equipment.

An online e-commerce platform where musician’s can post advertisements for things they’d like to sell and others can purchase the items.

the statement

The Global Reporting project provides insight to customers into the condition and maintenance investment of their global vehicle fleet. These insights will help customers make better decisions about maintenance providers and vehicle turnover.